Tools for the Job

Painting Checklist: The Tools to Use

Tools for the Job

Want to freshen up a room or add some new color to a tired space? Every year, millions of homeowners redecorate their space by adding a fresh coat of paint. While professional painters are always in demand, painting is still the most common DIY project. It’s easy to achieve professional results that will freshen up your mood as well as your room!

Research shows a difficult part of painting is getting started, and before you can begin, you need to get all the tools for the job. Selecting a new shade for your abode will be the hardest part, but paint manufacturers have lots of inspiring photography and color ideas. Lets focus on the tools needed to make sure the final results are just as attractive as the paint color.

  • Drop cloths and plastic sheeting – To avoid drips on the floor and spots on the furniture. Some plastic sheeting even comes with adhesive strips to quickly and easily secure to walls and floors.
  • Screwdriver – For the best paint job, don’t paint around switch plates, doorknobs and window latches. Remove them.
  • Drywall patch and sandpaper – No amount of paint will cover holes and cracks in walls. Take time now to patch holes with drywall compound and sand them out to ensure a clean, smooth surface.
  • Bucket and sponge – Surface preparation is key for professional results. Clean walls and other surfaces to ensure great looking results. Use water with a mild detergent and spend extra time around air returns/intakes and anywhere that is touched often.
  • Painting tape – A long-held secret of professional painters, painting tapes make painting projects easier and ensure professional results such as razor straight lines and few or no touch-ups later. A great tape, like Painter's Mate Green® painter's tape, is made from premium paper and backed with a one-of-a-kind adhesive with the strength to create a tight seal, while still easy to remove when the painting is done.
  • Paint roller, tray and brush – The essential painting tools for an amateur or professional. Choose the right roller for the surface (drywall, stucco, etc.) and the job. Different types of paint (latex vs. oil) need a different roller. A quality brush applies paint smoothly and evenly. Better yet, choose one that’s comfortable, too. Whatever you do, don’t skimp on the brush. Use a one-to-two-inch, nylon/polyester, angled brush because they can be used with all coatings.
  • Extension handle for the roller – Not for every project, but perfect for ceilings and other high, hard-to-reach areas.